I’m a nerd, and I freely admit it.  I get excited about dice, and roleplaying games, and moving little pewter miniatures around on a tabletop battlefield, pretending to be a great general.  (I have very little in the way of tactical skills.)  I think that’s part of the reason I really like sewing dice bags.  Everyone who games in some form or fashion needs a good dice bag, or at least that’s how I feel – and not just because I sell dice bags.  All those funny-shaped polyhedrons are an integral part of gamer culture, so why not have a snazzy way to carry yours and keep them safe?  I know that Knights of the Dinner Table can often be a roleplaying stereotype taken to an extreme, but just look at Brian van Hoose, who almost always has his dice bag hanging from his belt.

I’ve seen gamers keep their dice in little plastic compartmented containers, I’ve seen dice in ziploc bags, I’ve seen dice in Crown Royal bags.  Some people have “dice buckets” where the dice live, ready to be pulled out on game night.  Me, I’ve always had a dice bag, at least as long as I can remember.  My mom got me my first one, and that little black dice bag with the faux-leather rim stayed with me for almost twelve years, until I started making my own.  I’ve come a long way since that first dice bag, and there’s probably still room for improvement.

This summer I started trying to screen print designs on my dice bags, starting with a few orc skulls.  One customer put up a great review on his own blog, and you can read the entry here:

http://duelsanddice.blogspot.com/2012/08/artisian-dice-bags.html

I love hearing about customer experience with my stuff, and it’s great to get good feedback.  One thing that I do sometimes worry about is my price point – my bags are listed in my Etsy shop, Greyed Out, for between $16 and $18, with $3.50 in shipping.  I think that feels a bit high to some people, but I also think it’s reasonable for what I offer, and here’s why.

I make all of these dice bags myself.  It takes about an hour, sometimes a little more, to sew each dice bag.  That includes cutting the fabric, putting everything together, stringing the drawstring, and so on.  Each bag has about $2 of fabric in it.  I purchase all my own fabric, and I don’t drive, so each trip to Hobby Lobby with public transport takes a while.  That also has to be factored in.  Add in the time to wash the fabric, then screen print it, let the ink dry, set the ink, and so on, and it all adds up.  I’d like to make at least some profit on each sale, and I feel that my time is worth more than minimun wage.  Sure, you can get a dice bag manufactured in China for $3.99.  But why do that when the alternative is something sewn right here in the United States by someone who loves what he does?  To me, handmade means quality, and I do my best to make each of my dice bags perfect.  I don’t send out anything that I’m not happy with.

That said, I do have some new designs to show off.  Check them out, as always, at greyedout.etsy.com and feel free to email me with any questions.  I do have wholesale deals available if you’re interested in carrying my dice bags in your game store, bookshop, etc.

 

White orc skull on dark green cotton canvas.

 

A second orc skull dice bag.

 

Red suede bag with a hidden Inquisition symbol inside.

 

Black cotton canvas Inquisition bag.

 

Open dice bag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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