Archive for September, 2012

A few images of the crooked little houses I’ve made.

 

 

 

 

You can find part 1 of my tutorial on how to make these here:  https://thekiltedgerman.wordpress.com/2012/02/27/crooked-houses-a-tutorial/

Hey everyone,

 

It’s finally starting to feel like fall outside.  The air is starting to smell crisp, trees are beginning to change colors, and the nights are cool now.  In order to celebrate that, I wanted to have a fall sale at Greyed Out.

From now until the end of October, you can get free shipping using the coupon code FREESHIP or 25% off your order using the code FALLBASH.

 

I believe I mentioned it in my previous post, but I do think that everyone who has a dice collection should have an awesome dice bag to carry them in.  It’s simple and easy to get a mass-produced dice bag when you’re first starting out in your Dungeons and Dragons adventures, but why settle for that?  Greyed Out has a great selection of dice bags available, and while I do sell the same design multiple times, the chances of running into another person with the exact same dice bag are slim.  Get something cool and unique and give your dice a happy home.

You can find Greyed Out on Etsy at: greyedout.etsy.com

 

A few examples of my dice bags:

 

 

 

 

 

I’m a nerd, and I freely admit it.  I get excited about dice, and roleplaying games, and moving little pewter miniatures around on a tabletop battlefield, pretending to be a great general.  (I have very little in the way of tactical skills.)  I think that’s part of the reason I really like sewing dice bags.  Everyone who games in some form or fashion needs a good dice bag, or at least that’s how I feel – and not just because I sell dice bags.  All those funny-shaped polyhedrons are an integral part of gamer culture, so why not have a snazzy way to carry yours and keep them safe?  I know that Knights of the Dinner Table can often be a roleplaying stereotype taken to an extreme, but just look at Brian van Hoose, who almost always has his dice bag hanging from his belt.

I’ve seen gamers keep their dice in little plastic compartmented containers, I’ve seen dice in ziploc bags, I’ve seen dice in Crown Royal bags.  Some people have “dice buckets” where the dice live, ready to be pulled out on game night.  Me, I’ve always had a dice bag, at least as long as I can remember.  My mom got me my first one, and that little black dice bag with the faux-leather rim stayed with me for almost twelve years, until I started making my own.  I’ve come a long way since that first dice bag, and there’s probably still room for improvement.

This summer I started trying to screen print designs on my dice bags, starting with a few orc skulls.  One customer put up a great review on his own blog, and you can read the entry here:

http://duelsanddice.blogspot.com/2012/08/artisian-dice-bags.html

I love hearing about customer experience with my stuff, and it’s great to get good feedback.  One thing that I do sometimes worry about is my price point – my bags are listed in my Etsy shop, Greyed Out, for between $16 and $18, with $3.50 in shipping.  I think that feels a bit high to some people, but I also think it’s reasonable for what I offer, and here’s why.

I make all of these dice bags myself.  It takes about an hour, sometimes a little more, to sew each dice bag.  That includes cutting the fabric, putting everything together, stringing the drawstring, and so on.  Each bag has about $2 of fabric in it.  I purchase all my own fabric, and I don’t drive, so each trip to Hobby Lobby with public transport takes a while.  That also has to be factored in.  Add in the time to wash the fabric, then screen print it, let the ink dry, set the ink, and so on, and it all adds up.  I’d like to make at least some profit on each sale, and I feel that my time is worth more than minimun wage.  Sure, you can get a dice bag manufactured in China for $3.99.  But why do that when the alternative is something sewn right here in the United States by someone who loves what he does?  To me, handmade means quality, and I do my best to make each of my dice bags perfect.  I don’t send out anything that I’m not happy with.

That said, I do have some new designs to show off.  Check them out, as always, at greyedout.etsy.com and feel free to email me with any questions.  I do have wholesale deals available if you’re interested in carrying my dice bags in your game store, bookshop, etc.

 

White orc skull on dark green cotton canvas.

 

A second orc skull dice bag.

 

Red suede bag with a hidden Inquisition symbol inside.

 

Black cotton canvas Inquisition bag.

 

Open dice bag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the Slaptimber Painting Threat on the Waaagh Forums I threatened to paint my warboss and a mob of 21 boyz, the start of Waaagh Uzdreg. I have one observation so far: all that Bad Moon yellow is going to take me ages to paint. Good thing it calls attention to itself, so I can worry a little less about small slip-ups on the rest of the model. Plus, once the entire shoota mob is painted it will look great on the tabletop.

My current ork skin recipe: Basecoat with P3 Thornwood Green, and then cover with P3 Traitor Green. On the nobs and characters I’ll probably do something similar to Warboss Uzdreg, where the Traitor Green is carefully painted to leave a darker Thornwood Green in the recesses between the muscles.

My way of doing metals: I basecoat in Boltgun Metal, and then take a very thin coat of P3 Bloodstone and sort of wash/stipple it on. Makes the metals look a bit more dull and used. I may also do a super-thin wash of a green, and then another Bloodstone wash, to add even more dimension.

I’ll be trying to link to these update posts in the Slaptimber thread on the Waaagh Forum as well. Feedback would be awesome, but is not necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In other news, I completed several costume commissions for Dragon*Con, and both clients loved the work I did.  I’ve already been in communication to do a second costume for an anime convention in November, which is going to be exciting.

I’m planning several new print designs for dice bags, and have picked up some great Halloween fabric – a checkered purple and neon green that I’ll be combining with a deep purple fabric for a “Joker Edition” dice bag.  I’m really thrilled to see how it will come out.

As always, you can find my dice bags at http://www.greyedout.etsy.com

 

Happy gaming!